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Embarrassing English Errors

Phrasal Verbs With By – Effortless Phrasal Verbs

In this episode of Effortless Phrasal Verbs I teach you the concepts behind phrasal verbs that include the particle BY.

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Embarrassing English Errors: Wonder & Wander

In today’s Embarrassing English Errors episode I teach you guys the slight difference in pronunciation between the words WONDER & WANDER.

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Embarrassing English Errors: Wonder & Wander

G’day guys. Welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors. Today I want to do the words “Wonder” and “Wander”, “Wonder” and “Wander”.

So, both of these words can actually be a verb “To wander” or “To wonder” and a noun “A wonder”, “A wander”. With regards to the word “Wonder” as a verb it means to desire to know something, to feel curious. So, “To wonder”. “I wonder what job I’ll have in the future”. “I wonder what I’ll do tomorrow when my friend comes over”. As a noun, “A wonder” is a feeling of amazement and admiration caused by something beautiful, remarkable or unfamiliar, “A wonder”. “Have you explored the wonders of the Great Barrier Reef?”. So, that’s an example of that one.

“Wander” as a verb, “To wander”, means to walk or to move in a leisurely way. So, it’s kind of like to walk slowly with no real speed to it. It’s just to take your time and enjoy the walk. “I’m just wandering around town at the moment, I’m just going for a wander in the park”. And the noun, “A wander” is again a walk with no specific destination. So, a leisurely walk with no real specific destination. So, you could say, “I’m going for a wander in the park. I’m going for a wander in the forest. Do you want to go for a wander with me?”

So, what are some words in English that sound like “Wonder”?

Blunder

Thunder

Plunder

Chunder

Under

Sunder

And what are some words in English that sound like “Wander”?

Squander

Yonder

Ponder

Responder

Transponder

And I guess too something to discuss here quickly before we move onto the next exercises, the word “Wonder” is spelt with an “O”, “W-O-N-D-E-R”, “Wonder”. So, one way of thinking about the spelling of this when you write it if you’re trying to say that “I wonder why?” is to think of the word that is the past tense of the verb “To win”, “I won”. It sounds exactly the same. “Wonder”, “Won”, “Wonder”.

“Wander” on the other hand, is a difficult one because there aren’t too many words in English, I think, that are pronounced like an “On” sound but spelt with an “A”, but one cheat, or one little trick, could be if you’re thinking of going for “A wander”, like a walk, “A wander”, to think of the pronunciation or the spelling think of Harry Potter and his “Wand”, ‘cause that’s said in exactly the same way. “He has a wand, he uses his wand while he goes for a wander.” So, that’s one way of thinking about it.

So, let’s start by practicing the two different vowel sounds guys back to back 10 times:

Note: I’m going to spell them “Un” and “On” instead of “On” and “An”, respectively, in the following two exercises.

Un – on x 10

So, let’s go through and practice some different consonants in front of these two different vowel sounds guys. 

Wun – Won

Tun – Ton

Sun – Son

Lun – Lon

Cun – Con

Fun – Fon

Stun – Ston

Blun – Blon

Drun – Dron

Yun – Yon

Vun – Von

Zun – Zon

Pun – Pon

Bun – Bon

Nun – Non

Mun – Mon

Run – Ron

And let’s finish up with some pronunciation practice of these words in their entirety 10 times back to back.

Wonder – wander x 10

So, that’s it for today guys. If you have any other suggestions with regards to sounds or words that you have difficulty pronouncing in English feel free to send me a message on Facebook or comment below on this link when I post it up and let me know what you’d like help with. Until next times guys, all the best!

 

If you wish to support me and the many hours of hard work I put into The Aussie English Podcast then please consider donating a few dollars a month via Patreon! The more support I get, the more I can work on The Aussie English Podcast!

 

Check out all the other recent Embarrassing English Errors episodes below! 

Embarrassing English Errors: Salary and Celery

In this episode of Embarrassing English Errors I teach you guys the subtle difference in pronounce between the words Salary and Celery.

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Embarrassing English Errors – Salary and Celery

G’day guys. Welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors. I had a question from one of the listeners recently and I’m sorry I can’t remember the name of the person, but hopefully this episode reaches you and hopefully it helps. And the question was regarding the difference in pronunciation between the words “Salary” and “Celery”, “Salary” and “Celery”. So, I’ll go through the definitions of these words first.

“Salary”, the word “Salary” is a noun and it’s a form of periodic payment that you would get, or you would receive, from your employer if you were an employee. So, it’s your pay, the pay you get from your boss. Ah… your weekly salary could be $500. You could have a fortnightly salary, therefore, of $1000. Your monthly salary would be four times your weekly salary, which would be obviously $2000 in this case. And your yearly salary is obviously 52 times your weekly salary. So, that’s “Salary”, “Salary”. It’s your payment, a periodic payment.

“Celery”, on the other hand, “Celery” is another noun but this is a type of plant. So, it’s a type of vegetable that’s eaten. It’s long and fibrous, and in Australia celery tends to be eaten quite often at parties as a healthy treat with peanut butter on it. So, that’s “Celery”. It’s a type of vegetable.

So, I’ll go through the first syllable of each of these words guys. “Sal-“, I couldn’t find too many words that sounded like “Sal-“, that “S-A-L” from the first syllable from the word “Salary”, the money that you get paid, “Sal-“. There’s [there‘re*] two words in American English that I could think of off the top of my head. “Pal”, which is a good friend, “A pal”, a mate, “Pal”, and the word “Gal”, which is “Girl” in American English. She’s my “Gal”, she’s my “Girl”. So, “Pal”, “Gal”, and the word “Shall”, “Shall”, and this is sort of interchangeable with the word “Will”. As in, “I shall do that”, “I will do that”. So:

Pal

Gal

Shall

Words in English that sound like the first syllable of “Celery”, that “C-E-L”, “Celery”:

Cell

Bell

Gel

Dwell

Shell

Swell

Well

Yell

Spell

Smell

Tell

The second [and third] syllable[s] of “Salary”, your periodic payment:

Airy

Berry

Dairy

Cherry

Merry

Prairie

Sherry

Scary

Very

And the second [and third] syllable[s] of “Celery”, the vegetable, “Celery”:

Blurry

Furry

Burry

Burly

Early

Curly

Pearly

Surly

Girly

Shirley [a name]

So that said though, when spoken quickly, “Salary” and “celery” are going to sound pretty much exactly the same, whether it’s the first syllable or the second [and third] syllable[s], and people tend to understand what you’re talking about based on context. If you’re talking about what you’re going to eat people aren’t going to be confused thinking you’re talking about what you’re employer is paying you. And if you’re talking about your wage or your “Salary”, the payment you get from your employer, people aren’t going to get confused thinking you’re talking about the vegetable “Celery”.

So, let’s just go through and do some back to back exercises 10 times here guys where I will try and pronounce the words differently so that you can hear that slight vowel change, slight pronunciation change, between these syllables.

Sal- vs Cel- x 10

-Ary vs -Ery x 10

Salary vs Celery x 10

So, that’s the episode for today guys. I hope you’ve enjoyed it. I know it’s a little confusing. I wouldn’t worry too much about nailing the pronunciation between these two things. As I said, context is almost always going to save you hear where people will understand whether or not you pronounce these words exactly correct they’ll know what you’re talking about. If you have any other words or any other sounds that you’re finding difficult in English then feel free to send me a message on Facebook or put a comment on this post when I put it up, and tell me about the words or the sounds that you’re having trouble with. Until next times guys, all the best!

 

If you wish to support me and the many hours of hard work I put into The Aussie English Podcast then please consider donating a few dollars a month via Patreon! The more support I get, the more I can work on The Aussie English Podcast!

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Check out all the other recent Embarrassing English Errors episodes below!

Embarrassing English Errors Ep16: Think & Sink

In today’s episode of Embarrassing English Errors Ep16: Think & Sink I teach you how to pronounce the difference between the words “Think” and “Sink.

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Embarrassing English Errors Ep16: Think & Sink

So, welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors guys. Today we’re going to go through the words “Think” and “Sink”.

So, “To think” means to have a particular belief or idea. And the verb “To sink” means to go below the surface of something, so like, “To sink below the water”, or to descend from a higher to a lower position, so to drop downwards. So, if you sit in a really really soft couch or a soft chair you could say that you’re sinking into the chair. So, it’s that idea of going down into something. And obviously if you’re saying “I’m thinking” and you accidentally pronounce this “I’m sinking” you’re going to confuse a lot of people at least initially. Obviously, they’re going to get what you mean, they’ll understand when you keep talking, you know, and say “I’m sinking of something”, they’re going to know what you mean, but it’s one of those small changes that you can make to sound more natural, to sound more native, and to just make conversation a lot more fluid.

So, what are some other words in English that have that “Theh” sound at the start of it [them*], like the word “Think”:

Thick

Thin

Thing

Thimble

Thistle

Thinner

Thicken

Thesaurus

And what are some other words that sound like “Sink” and have that “Seh” at the start of it [them*]:

Cyst

Sick

Sixth

Silk

Silly

Sift

Cigar

City

Sibling

Sickened

So, we’ll go through the “Theh” and “Seh” sound[s] 10 times:

Theh – Seh x 10

And now we’ll go through the different words “Think” and “Sink” 10 times:

Think – sink x 10

And I might do a little bonus at the end here guys with the word “Sixth”, because this is a very evil and hard to pronounce word in English. “Sixth”, so number 6, if you come “Sixth in a race” it means that you finished in the posisition number 6. “Sixth” it’s spelt “S-I-X-T-H” and so you say “Si…” “Sic” and then you end with a “ssss thhhh” sound. So, it’s sort of like you switch from a “Seh” to a “Theh” in one motion after “Sic”. “Sixth”, “Sixth”. So, you move through multiple consonants here guys. You end with an “ic” sound then you have a “Ss” sound and then a “Th” sound. So, it’s like a:

Ic-Ss-Th x 5

Sixth x 15

And, I’m not 100% sure but I think that may be the only word in English that sounds like that, that has that “X-T-H” sound. Anyway, thanks for listening to this episode guys, and if you have any other difficult to pronounce English sounds that you would like me to do an Embarrassing English Errors episode on then feel free to message or comment me on Facebook. Have a good one guys!

Embarrassing English Errors Ep15: Speak & Spick

In today’s episode, Embarrassing English Errors Ep15: Speak & Spick, I teach you how to pronounce the subtle difference between the words “Speak” and “Spick”.

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Embarrassing English Errors Ep15 – Speak & Spick

G’day guys. Welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors.

Today we’re going to go over the two words “Speak” and “Spick”. “Speak” is obviously a verb, and it means to talk or to say, you know, you speak with someone. “Spick” on the other hand, for me at least I mostly hear this when you watch TV shows or movies from the US, from America, and it’s a derogatory term for people from South America or Mexico. So, they say “Spick” for someone who is an immigrant from these areas and speaks Spanish as their first language. So, I’d imagine it’s from the word “Hispanic”, “-spanic”, and so they get the word “Spick”. So, that’s why it’s obviously a word that you don’t want to necessarily mix up when you’re speaking, especially with other Americans, and especially with Americans who originate from Mexico or South America. It’s also used in a term “Spick and span”, which means really clean or really tidy, and this doesn’t have an derogatory or nasty meaning, but I can’t think of it being used in anything other than that and mostly derogatory speech when talking about Hispanics in um… America.

Anyway, what are some other words in English that have the same sound “-eak” from “Speak”?

Speech

Speed

Speaker

Species

Speechless

Speedily

Speedo

And what are some other ones that have that “Spih” [sound] from “Spick”?

Spiff

Spill

Spilt

Spin

Spit

Spear

Spitfire

Spirit

Spinoff

And some other words in English that have the vowel sounds form both “Speak” and “Spick”. We’ll go through “Speak” first.

Weak

Reek

Peek

Greek

Bleak

Cheek

Squeak

And then “Spick”.

Wick

Brick

Chick

Click

Nick

Rick

Thick

Stick

So, now let’s go through a few made up words and real words to practice the pronunciation of these two vowel sounds, and we’ll use different consonants at the start of these words, and they’ll end in “-ick” or “-eak”.

Shick – Sheek

Lick – Leek

Bick – Beak

Dick – Deak

Thick – Theek

Fick – Feek

Stick – Steek

Flick – Fleak

Chick – Cheek

So, now we can go through the two different vowel sounds five times.

Ih x Ee x 5

And now we’ll go through the words “Speak” and “Spick” back to back so you can practice switching from one word to the other ten times.

Speak & spick x 5

So, that’s it for today’s episode guys. If you have any other words that you’re having difficulty pronouncing then feel free to send me a message or comment on Facebook and I’ll do an episode on them as soon as I can. Until then guys have a good one!

Embarrassing English Errors Ep14: Shit & Sheet

In this episode of Embarrassing English Errors Ep14: Shit & Sheet I teach you guys the subtle difference in pronunciation between the words “Shit” and “Sheet”, which can often lead to some embarrassing misunderstands in English.

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Embarrassing English Errors Ep14: Shit & Sheet

G’day guys and welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors. Today we’re going to work on the two words “shit” and “sheet”. And this was another one that my Spanish friends got me onto because they often hated talking about their bed sheets.

So, “A sheet” is that layer of cloth or that layer of fabric that you would put on your bed. Or you can have a sheet of something, which tends to just mean a thin layer of something. So, a sheet of paper, a sheet of cloth, a sheet of metal.

And obviously, “Shit” is a rude word that refers to poo, a turd, a crap, “Shit”.

So, you can obviously see that if you confuse the word “Sheet” for “Shit” it can lead to some pretty embarrassing situations, say, if you were trying to talk about “Have you cleaned your sheets” and you accidentally said, “Have you cleaned your shits”. Or you say, you know, “I need… I need a sheet”, you could accidentally say “I needa shit”, which makes it sound like you need to go to the toilet. Or you could say “I’m putting sheets on my bed” and instead of saying sheets you say “I’m putting shits on my bed”, which sounds very bizarre, and will probably get a lot people to laugh if anything. So, don’t be too worried about making these kinds of errors guys just… it’s just one thing to be aware of and that you can always practice to try and fix up. So, hence these episodes.

So, the word “Sheet”, what are some other words in English that have this same “Eet” or “Ee” sound?

Beat

Cheat

Fleet

Greet

Feet

Meet

Heat

Neat

Peat

Street

Treat

Tweet

And “Shit”, and some other words in English that have the same “It” sound from “Shit”.

Bit

Fit

Grit

Hit

Split

Wit

Slit

Spit

Twit

Pit

Knit

And now we can go through some made up words to practice these two different vowel sounds.

It – Eet

Bit – Beet

Lit – Leet

Sit – Seet

Pit – Peet

Fit – Feet

Blit – Bleet

Thit – Theet

Frit – Freet

Clit – Cleet

And now we’ll do these two different vowel sounds five times back to back.

Ee – Ih x 5

And now we can do “Sheet” and “Shit” 10 times back to back.

Sheet – Shit x 10

So that’s today’s episode guys. I hope it’s helped, and if you have any other words that you’re having trouble pronouncing in English feel free to send me a message or comment on Facebook, and I’ll chat to you next time. See you later guys!

Embarrassing English Errors Ep13: Ship & Sheep

In today’s episode, Embarrassing English Errors Ep13: Ship & Sheep, I teach you the subtle difference between the pronunciation of the words “ship” and “sheep” in English.

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Embarrassing English Errors Ep13: Ship & Sheep

G’day guys and welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors. Today we’re going to go over two words “ship” and “sheep”. So, is obviously a boat. Something you use to cross an ocean or to cross a river or to sail on a river or to sail in an ocean, on the sea. “A sheep” is a kind of animal you would find on a farm. It grows wool, and has lambs as babies, and produces meat such as well lamb, mutton, etc. Um… that’s “a sheep”.

So, what are some other words in English that sound like “ship” and have that same “ip” sound, or “ih”.

Kip

Lip

Pip

Bit

Shit

It

Bitch

Sit

Lit

Fit

And what are some other words in English that have the same “ee” or “eep” sound from “sheep”.

Sleep

Beep

Keep

Steep

Peep

Meet

Beat

Eat

Beach

Feet

So, let’s practice the vowel sound by itself five times. The different “ee” and “ih”.

Ee – Ih x 5

And now we’ll do the sound “eep” and “ip” five times.

Eep – Ip x 5

And now we can do the two words “sheep” and “ship” ten times. 

Sheep – ship x 5

So, that was it for this episode guys. I hope it’s helped, and don’t forget to send me a message on Facebook if you have any other words or sounds that are difficult to pronounce in English that you would like me to do an episode for. Until next time guys, have a good one!

 

If you guys enjoyed this episode of Embarrassing English Errors then make sure you check out the rest of the episodes and transcripts here. Also, don’t forget to come visit me on Facebook and let me know what you think of the podcast and say hey to the Aussie English community!

Embarrassing English Errors Ep12: Pepper & Paper

In today’s episode you’ll learn how to pronounce the slight difference between the words “Pepper” and “Paper” in English.

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Embarrassing English Errors Ep12: Pepper & Paper

G’day guys. Welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors.

Today we are going to go over the words “Pepper” and “Paper”. So, the “eh” and “ay” vowel sounds.

So, what is “Pepper”? “Pepper” is a pungent hot tasting spice that is often added to foods to flavour them. Or it could also be what we would more say in Australian English, “Capsicum”, but you could also say red, green or yellow peppers. So, red pepper, green pepper, yellow peppers. They’re a type of vegetable.

Paperis a material manufactured into thin sheets from wood pulp. You write on paper. Books are made from paper.

Um… so what are some other words in English that sound like “Pepper” and use that “eh ah” sound in them?

Leper

Better

Beggar

Cheddar

Clever

Never

Terror

Weather

Teller

And what are some other English words that have that “Ay” or “Ay eh” sound in them like “Paper”?

Later

Payer

Layer

Acre

Baker

Crater

Labour

Waiter

Player

So, you can obviously see that if you were to go to a restaurant and ask a waiter for something like “Paper” instead of “Pepper” he may bring you the wrong thing. So, if you asked for “Pepper” he’ll bring you pepper, but if you accidentally said “Paper” he might bring you some paper to write on instead of “Pepper”.

So, we can practice the vowel sound now five times back to back. The “Eh” and “Ay”.

Eh – ay x 5

And now “Epper” and “Aper” five times.

Epper – Aper x 5

And now we can do “Pepper” and “Paper” five times. 

Pepper – paper x 5

So, that’s all for this episode guys. Remember to send me a message or a comment on Facebook if you have any other words that can be easily mispronounced and confused with one another, or even if you just have some other pronunciation questions. Send me a message of a comment on Facebook or message me on the website. Have a good one guys!

 

If you guys enjoyed this episode of Embarrassing English Errors then make sure you check out the rest of the episodes and transcripts here. Also, don’t forget to come visit me on Facebook and let me know what you think of the podcast and say hey to the Aussie English community!

Embarrassing English Errors Ep11: Rice & Lice

In this episode, Embarrassing English Errors Ep11: Rice & Lice, you’ll learn how to pronounce the slight difference between the words “Lice” and “Rice”. So, focusing on the “R” and “L” sounds in English.

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Embarrassing English Errors Ep11: Lice & Rice

G’day guys and welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors.

Today I’m going to go over the two words “Lice” and “Rice”, and these are two words that are often confused or mispronounced by Asian speakers, I think, especially Japanese speakers because they don’t have an “R” or an “L” sound like we do in English. So, they confuse the two quite often.

So, “Rice”. “Rice” in English is a swamp grass, which is widely cultivated as a source of food. So, it’s a crop. You know. You eat rice in a lot of things like sushi.

Lice”, on the other hand, “Lice” with an “L” at the start of it, is the plural form of “Louse”. And “a louse” is a kind of parasitic insect that lives on the skin of mammals and birds. So, for those of you who do or don’t know, “Lice” in English refer[s] to the small white creatures that children often get in their hair at… at school when they’re very young, and you have to either like, shave their heads, or wash their hair with special conditions and shampoos, and use a comb to pull all of the lice and their eggs out of the hair of your kids. So, they’re kind of two very very different things, and obviously if you were to ask someone for “rice” and you accidentally said “rice” they could get pretty confused. So… or if you said something like “I really like rice” and you accidentally said “I really like lice”, or “I want to eat some rice”, “I want to eat some lice”, “he has rice”, “he has lice”. You can see how these things would be easily confused.

So, let’s practice some other words in English that have that “Li-“ sound in them.

Lie

Life

Light

Like

Line

Lime

Liar

License

Lion

And some other words in English that have the “Ri-“ at the start of them.

Ride

Rife

Right

Rind

Rise

Rhyme

Rhino

Riot

Rightful

Rider

Rifle

So, now we’ll do the “Li-“ and “Ri-“ [sounds] back to back five times.

Li – Ri x 5

And now we’ll go through some of the different English vowels, and I’ll use “L-“ and “R-“ at the start of them.

Ligh                 –          Righ               (light sound)

Lee                   –          Ree                (speed sound)

Li                      –          Ri                    (it sound)

Lay                   –          Ray                (play sound)

Loe                   –          Roe                (go sound)

Low                  –          Row               (cow sound)

Loo                   –          Roo                (zoo sound)

Lare                 –          Rare              (care sound)

Lah                   –          Rah                (cat sound)

Lear                 –          Rear              (ear sound)

Law                  –          Raw               (law sound)

Ler                    –          Rer                 (serve sound)

Lah                   –          Rah                (laugh sound)

Loy                   –          Roy                (boy sound)

Lo                      –          Ro                  (not sound)

And now I’ll do “Lice” and “Rice” back to back 10 times.

Lice – Rice x 10

So, that’s today’s episode guys. I hope it’s helped. Make sure you listen multiple times and keep practicing until you can really nail these two different sounds, and sound a lot more natural when speaking English. If you have any other questions, or any other sounds, or words in English that you’re confusing and finding hard to pronounce feel free to send me a message or comment on Facebook and I’ll do an episode on that sound or that word or words as soon as I can. Have a good one guys!

 

If you guys enjoyed this episode of Embarrassing English Errors then make sure you check out the rest of the episodes and transcripts here. Also, don’t forget to come visit me on Facebook and let me know what you think of the podcast and say hey to the Aussie English community!

Embarrassing English Errors Ep10: Eat & It

In today’s episode, Embarrassing English Errors Ep10: Eat & It, you’ll learn how to pronounce the difference between the words “Eat” and “It”.

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Embarrassing English Errors Ep10 – Eat & It

G’day guys. Welcome to this episode of Embarrassing English Errors.

In this episode I’m going to go over the two words “it” and “eat”. So, “it” is obviously a pronoun, “I want it”, “I can see it”, “I want to have it”. And “eat” is a verb. “To eat”, “I want to eat something”, “I need to eat”. Obviously, if you confuse these two things, so instead of saying “I want it” you accidentally said “I want eat”, it’s going to make it sound like you want to eat as opposed to you want something that you’re talking about. “I want it”, “I want eat”.

Um… so other words in English that sound like “it” or have that “ih” at the start of them:

If

Ilk

Ill

Imp

In

Inch

Ink

And other words in English that have that same “ee” sound at the start of them like “eat”:

Each

Ease

Eel

Eve

Eek

Eon

Ego

Egypt

Either

Easy

So, let’s just do these sounds back to back. The two vowel sounds 10 times.

Ee – Ih x 10

And now let’s do the words “eat” and “it” back to back 10 times.

Eat – It x 10

So, that’s it for today’s episode guys. I hope you liked it and I hope it’s helping. I hope it’s helping nail your pronunciation in English, especially these very very close sounds that are often hard to pronounce between one another, ‘cause I know what it’s like in different languages doing that. Anyway guys, that’s today’s episode. I hope it’s helped and I hope it’s making pronunciation a lot easier by following these different episodes and practicing them. I definitely recommend listening multiple times in order to keep practicing these sounds until it just becomes subconscious. It becomes natural. You don’t have to think about it. You just do it. So, just remember that if you have any other words or any other sounds in English that you are finding really difficult to pronounce differently then feel free to send me a message on Facebook or on the website. Send me a comment. Get in touch with me and I’ll do an episode on whatever it is you’re having trouble with as soon as I can. So, until next time guys, have a good one!

 

If you guys enjoyed this episode of Embarrassing English Errors then make sure you check out the rest of the episodes and transcripts here. Also, don’t forget to come visit me on Facebook and let me know what you think of the podcast and say hey to the Aussie English community!

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