Pronunciation: Will not have = won’t have – won’t’ve – won’ah

In today’s episode I teach you how to contract “Will not have” into the forms “Won’t have”, “Won’t’ve” and “Won’ah”.

Pronunciation: Will not have = won’t have – won’t’ve – won'(t)’ah

G’day guys. Welcome to this episode of Aussie English. Today we’re going to do a pronunciation episode, and the episode’s going to focus on the contraction of “Will not have”, “Will not have”. And this gets contraction to three different forms, more or less, “Won’t have” is the first one. “Won’t’ve” is the second one. And “Won’t’ah” or “Won’ah” is the third one. So, you can sort of leave that “T” in there, “Won’t’ah”, “Won’t’ah” and turn the “Have” into an “ah” sound, “Won’t’ah”, or you can just completely remove that “T” and say “Won’ah”, “Won’ah”, “Won’ah”.

Note: “Won’t have” is the only contracted form that is written formally, although “Won’t’ve” may be written informally. “Won’t’ah” and “Won’ah” have just been written phonetically like this in this episode to show you guys how I pronounce these contractions.

So, the form here, without getting too much into the grammar, is “Will not have + a past participle” from another verb. So, “Will not have + been”, “Will not have + gone”, “Will not have + done”, “Will not have + asked”, etc., etc., etc. So, it’s used when talking about something that has happened but in the future, hence the use of “Will” in the future, future tense.

So, for example, my plane arrives at the airport at 12PM so I won’t have arrived by 11PM, but I could also say, “I won’t’ah arrived by 11PM” or “I won’ah arrived by 11PM”. It’s kind of really… a little weird to say the entire uncontracted form as I’ve told you guys plenty of times before. English contracts a lot of things just so that you can convey the information you’re trying to say really quickly. So, you wouldn’t really say “My plane arrives at 12PM so I will not have arrived by 11PM” unless you were trying to be incredibly articulate and polite, or unless someone was sort of having difficulty understanding you and you needed to annunciate and say each of those words. Say, if you were a very very early beginner of English and you didn’t know what “Won’ah” meant, and you needed someone to say “Will not have”.

So, another example could be “I need a PhD to get this job. The application for the job is due in December this year. So, if I want to apply for this job I need have gotten my PhD by December, but unfortunately I’m not graduating until January. So, I could say, “I am not eligible for the job because I won’t’ah graduated until January next year. I will not have graduated until January next year. I won’t have graduated. I won’t’ve graduated. I won’ah graduated.” So, you get the idea.

So, we’ll just jump straight into the pronunciation exercises guys where I go through all the different contracted forms of “Will not have” with all of the different pronouns, I, you, he, she, we, they.

I will not have…

I won’t have…

I won’t’ve

I won’ah

 

You will not have…

You won’t have…

You won’t’ve

You won’ah

 

He will not have…

He won’t have…

He won’t’ve…

He won’ah…

 

She will not have…

She won’t have…

She won’t’ve…

She won’ah…

 

We will not have…

We won’t have…

We won’t’ve…

We won’ah…

 

They will not have…

They won’t have…

They won’t’ve…

They won’ah…

 

So, again, this is just a good exercise for you guys to do to 1. practice your pronunciation but also make you familiar with all the different kinds of contractions of the form, in this case, “Will not have”. So, just to speed things up we can go straight to the substitution exercises guys where I’m going to say a series of sentences and in this first substitution exercise I want you to convert “Won’t have” into “Won’t’ve”. So, in all the sentences I say the first one I’m going to say is “Won’t have”. It’s going to have the form “Won’t have” and I want you to say the exact same sentence but contracted to “Won’t’ve”, Won’t’ve”. So let’s start.

 

Substitution exercise: Won’t have to won’t’ve

I won’t have arrived by then.

I won’t’ve arrived by then.

He won’t have thought of that issue.

He won’t’ve thought of that issue.

She won’t have got to work that early.

She won’t’ve got to work that early.

You won’t have finished the essay in time.

You won’t’ve finished the essay in time.

Things won’t have been as bad as you think.

Things won’t’ve been as bad as you think.

Don’t worry, it won’t have all been for nothing.

Don’t worry, it won’t’ve all been for nothing.

Tomorrow they won’t have shown up until after you.

Tomorrow they won’t’ve shown up until after you.

We won’t have eaten a big lunch before dinner tomorrow.

We won’t’ve eaten a big lunch before dinner tomorrow.

 

So, even here guys, as I’ve said in previous episodes, I can tell that for me I keep naturally deviating, naturally wanting to say “Won’t’ve”, “Won’t’ve” instead of “Won’t have”. It’s a little more unnatural for me to say “Won’t have”. Instead, I like to just say “Won’t’ve” or “Won’ah”. So, I keep finding myself trying to say “Won’t’ve” in all the cases. Anyway, let’s do the next substitution exercise guys and this time I’m going to say the same sentences but this time I’m going to say them with “Won’t’ve” and I want you to convert them into “Won’ah”, “Won’ah”, “Won’ah”.

Substitution exercise: Won’t’ve to won’ah

 

I won’t’ve arrived by then.

I won’ah arrived by then.

He won’t’ve thought of that issue.

He won’ah thought of that issue.

She won’t’ve got to work that early.

She won’ah got to work that early.

You won’t’ve finished the essay in time.

You won’ah finished the essay in time.

Things won’t’ve been as bad as you think.

Things won’ah been as bad as you think.

Don’t worry, it won’tve all been for nothing.

Don’t worry, it won’ah all been for nothing.

Tomorrow they won’t’ve shown up until after you.

Tomorrow they won’ah shown up until after you.

We won’t’ve eaten a big lunch before dinner tomorrow.

We won’ah eaten a big lunch before dinner tomorrow.

 

So, that’s really all there is to it guys. Just keep practicing it. Get an idea of what these different contractions sound like, and get a feel for how to say them. So, that when you use them yourself, you know, just try all of the different forms and see which one is more easy for you to use when you speak. Native speakers are going to understand all of these, but the main reason I try and teach you all the different forms is that just in case you get into a habit of using the most contracted forms when you speak, whether it’s with natives or with people who speak English as a second language, if they ask you to articulate and repeat what you’ve said, because they haven’t understood, you know how to uncontract the different forms so that you can go from “Won’ah” to “Won’t’ve”, “Won’t have” and “Will not have” if people are having trouble. On the other hand, if I was to only ever teach you “Won’t’ah” or “Won’ah”, the very very most contracted form, and you were to use this all the time, you might forget that the uncontracted form is “Will not have”, “Will not have”. Anyway, guys, that’s enough for this episode. I hope you’ve enjoyed it and I’ll chat to you soon. All the best!